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DISCLAIMER: Military Antiques Museum has no sympathies with any past or present parties or military regimes....except the United States of America! Our items are offered for historical, educational, reference, or collecting value only.

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ULG-0001 Late 1800s Wells Fargo Stage Coach Strong Box

This item is listed for historical interest only. It is not for sale.
Item #21984

It is painted dark red / brown and is very heavy (around 45 pounds to 50 pounds). Very durable and it takes a lot of force to move it and pick it up. The inside of the lock has some dirt and dust that is easily removable, and has some paint chipping. The top lid has a nice and simple decoration (see pictures). The bottom has some indistinguishable markings and paint loss. Overall, the box retains at least 80-85 percent of its paint.

The lock is from Eagle Lock Company, a formerly large company established in 1833 that lost business after a strike in 1975. It also is marked by Victor Safe & Lock Co., which was in business in 1885 starting in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1987, the name and logo was taken by Turn-10 Wholesale. The lock comes with a key.

Measurements: Nearly 12.5 inches wide, nearly 7 inches tall, and 9 inches long. The inside fits 9 3/4ths wide, nearly 6 inches long, and 3.75 inches tall. It weighs fifty pounds.

A strong box like this typically went on the back of a stage coach during travel for safe keeping. Noting the lack of law enforcement and rampant crime at the time, these boxes were purposely heavy to deter criminals from taking them and easily running off with them. Prized possessions such as jewelry or money typically went inside them.

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